Monthly Archives: March 2013

hw for 4/1

 

1)I watch T.V. on my television in my living room at home mostly. At school, I am finding it hard to watch regular t.v. simply because the T.V. in my room doesn’t have cable. I do, however, watch a lot of episodes of shows on Netflix. I find it very very addicting! 

2) I have briefly watched reality T.V. shows but I really do not enjoy watching them. There is nothing like a good scripted drama (late nights on sunday, usually on HBO) to put me in a good mood. I think reality TV is literally the demise of entertainment and furthermore, artistic film. 

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3/27

I did not realize how many movies employ visual special effects. Stuff like making a sky shot look more interesting or changing the time of day was totally unknown to me. I thought VFX was only stuff like explosions or laser beams. Furthermore, I did not realize that scripts usually do not have any visual effects written into them. This is interesting because it makes VFX production an improvisational art. VFX supervisors meet with directors to figure out how to enhance a certain project and see were more visuals are needed. I think that is fascinating because it does not give them a lot of time to generate ideas for what to do; these VFX people have to work a lot on the fly. 

Hw for 3/25

Some key differences between film and other mediums we have discussed in class (such as photography and graphic narratives) include providing different roles for the audience member, constant movement and “mise-en-scène”. Film, unlike photography and graphic narratives, asks that the audience sit back and view the artistic product. It does not require picking up a book and flipping pages for example. Movies are also in constant motion, sort of like a sped up graphic narrative which lacks “gutters” that provide short gaps in time. When watching a movie, time is manipulated by light, dialogue and camera play. Lastly, while both photography and graphic narratives reflect aspects of “miss-en-scène”, it is more typically thought of as a cinematographic characteristic. The placement of objects/subjects (set-pieces, characters in action, lighting, etc.) crafts a desired and anticipated image on the part of the movie director. Such desired images can be achieved in staged photography but because the frame lacks movement, photographic miss-en-scene is less affective at telling a story. Similarly, while the elements within the panels of graphic narratives are consciously chosen, because they are hand drawn they are not as successful. 

From the Corrigan and Kawin pieces I learned a lot about perspective and what to pay attention to upon viewing a film. I learned that things that appear in succession are significant and that the angle a certain shot is taken can manipulate how characters are physically and metaphysically represented. Lastly and most interestingly, i learned that movies can lack narratives. ‘Nonnarritives’ as they are called “do not tell stories” (Corrigan 41). This was the most fascinating because I originally thought films were all about story telling, now I see that the message and purpose of the movie might be more important. 

HW for 2/20

1. The author Chute from the last set of readings talks about “double vision,” explaining how both words and images play a role in telling their own stories within the comic strip. Similarly, Schwartz states that “Manga are said to require ‘a complex visual reading on the party of the reader’ ” where readers must navigate “image plus language”. Furthermore, “Manga readers are likely to attend to graphical information at the same hierarchical level  as the printed text”. 

2.  Ogi’s writing style is extremely fluid and easy to read. I liked her style because she really took the time to explain all the things that an American reader would be unaware of (i.e. like defining japanese words and the overall mana genre of shoujo and yaoi.) 

3. Ogi argues that Shoujo manga has provided women, who come from male dominated societies, with an understanding of themselves by creating feminine and sometimes passive homosexual characters.

 

 

 

 

Comics/Graphic Narrative Hw

My first point is one of disagreement. The essay titled “The Image Sequence; or, Moving Modernist Pictures” states that comics are easily read, creating a “lucid, easily comprehensible visual narrative”. In the Chute’s piece, however, one graphic artist by the name of Sacco refutes this claim. Sacco’s pieces often times require an extensive decoding process due to the comic’s confusing nature which makes the reader unable to glance from the text to the image with ease. The rhythm of Saccos work is purposely disruptive to the reader’s eye in order to make the reader think. My second point is one of congruence. Chute says that comics contain “double vision,” meaning that both the words and the images in a comic strip tell stories. “The Image Sequence” essay agrees, stating that a comic strip, complete with text and imagery, can read like a novel. Lastly, one question I have about “An art of Tensions” by Charles Hatfield is: What exactly is meant by the tension of sequence v. surface? 

Final Version of Infographic w/ Reflection Response

This bar graph illustrates how many seats each party has had over the last decade in the House of Representatives. While the graph does not manipulate information, it makes the information more graspable. Ultimately, it depicts how much support a President will receive in one congressional term, mapping out which side of the House is in the majority. For example, in the middle of President Barack Obama’s first term of office, the House radically changed from being a Democratic majority to a Republican one. Between the 111th and 112th congresses the physical length difference between the two bars representing Republican seats explains this shift in political opinion. During this congressional transition, Anti-Obama sentiment popularized, paving the way for the Tea Party movement. The use of color-codes to indicate each party helps to illustrate movements in congressional representation as well. By graphing the information in this way one is able to see saliently whether a President will have the political opportunity to pass legislation. When the President does not have party support in the House, political tactics like filibustering and gridlock, on the part of the opposing party, delay the policies put forth by the President. Lastly, the graph shows how greatly polarized American politics are today. Lets again take Barack Obama as an example. He is a democratic President that must deal with a republican congress, thus most of his bills do not get passed. This graph highlights America’s political shifts in opinion while also providing insight into how much House support a President will have.

The House Over the Past 10 Years

This bar graph illustrates how many seats each party has had over the last 10 years in the House of Representatives. Rather than the information change in meaning or significance, I think the graph makes this information more graspable. It visually depicts the force with which a President must act when the majority of the House is not of a similar party. For example, in the middle of President Barack Obama’s first term of office the House radically changed from being a democratic majority to a Republican one. This was due to a rise in Anti-Obama sentiment in America and also the galvanization of the Tea Party movement. I also think the graph clearly illustrates jumps in congressional representation. Between the 111th and 112th congresses, for instance, the physical length difference between the two bars representing Republican seats illustrate a huge shift in political opinion in America. By graphing the information in this way, I am able to see saliently whether a President will have the political opportunity to pass his or her own legislation. When one side of the House has the majority, political tactics like filibustering and gridlock delay the policies put forth by the President. Lastly, the graph shows how greatly polarized American politics are today. Lets again take Barack Obama as an example. He is a democratic President that must deal with a republican congress, thus most of his bills do not get passed. This graph illustrates America’s political divisions while also providing insight into how much support a President will have in office.